Home

      Live Coronavirus

        MBA Courses

        Masters

        Admissions

        GMAT

          Business Schools

          MBA Rankings

          MBA Jobs

          Watch

            GMAT Sample Questions & Answers

            GMAT sample questions and answers written by our admissions experts

            In fact, in this question only answer choice B correctly identifies the first statement as the main conclusion of the argument. 

            In order to solve this question, you would have to understand the argument and identify the conclusion, even through it is not placed at tge end of the argument. Once you correctly identify the argument’s conclusion, this question is quite straightforward. 


            Read More: What Is A Good GMAT Score?


            GMAT Sample Questions: Quantitative


            Data Sufficiency


            Question:

            At a bakery, all donuts are priced equally and all bagels are priced equally. What is the total price of 5 donuts and 3 bagels at the bakery?

            (1) At the bakery, the total price of 10 donuts and 6 bagels is $12.90.

            (2) At the bakery, the price of a donut is $0.15 less than the price of a bagel.

            A. If statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked;

            B. If statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked;

            C. If BOTH statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question asked, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient;

            D. If EACH statement ALONE is sufficient to answer the question asked;

            E. If statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question asked, and additional data specific to the problem are needed.

            Answer:

            Here we need to evaluate how sufficient the statements (1) and (2) are to answer the question asked, and choose the correct alternative accordingly.

            If we let d be the price of 1 Donut and b be the price of 1 Bagel, statements (1) and (2) can be re-expressed as:

            1. 10d + 6b = 12.90

            2. d = b - 0.15

            Mathematically, the only way to get the values of d and b is to use the equations from both statements at the same time and solve a typical school-exercise of simultaneous equations. This will help us get the values of d and b. We would then be enabled to answer any question related to those variables.

            However, we are faced with twi facts that should be examined carefully:

            Fact 1) The only alternative above that considers using both statements being used together is (C) If BOTH statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question asked, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient.

            Fact 2) The question is actually not asking for the values of b and d; rather it requires the price of a combo: 5d + 3b.

            Let’s look attentively to statement 1, in the question, on its own:  10d + 6b = 12.90.

            If we divide both sides by 2, we will have 5d + 3b = 6.45

            This means that the price for 5 donuts and 3 bagels is $6.45!! That’s the answer we were looking for!

            Statement (1) alone allows us to answer the question proposed; statement (2) alone only informs us about the difference in prices between a donut and bagel is clearly not sufficient to answer the question asked.

            Final Answer:

            A. If statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked


            Problem solving: Arithmetic


            Question:

            If 893 × 78 = p, which of the following is equal to 893 × 79?

            (A) p + 1

            (B) p + 78

            (C) p + 79

            (D) p + 893

            (E) p + 894

            Answer:

            1.              Common approach

            The unprepared approach to this question would lead us to determine the value of p.

            Indeed, we could obtain p after some strenuous calculations. p would be 893 x 78 which leads to the value of p: p = 69654.

            Then we need to move on to another hard, time-consuming sum: 893 x 79, which gives us 70547. If that’s not enough work, we need now to relate both numbers, as all the answers (including the correct one!)  require us to express the new number (70547) in terms of p.

            Since 70547 – 69654 = 893, we conclude that 70547 = 69654 + 893, which is the same as saying that 70547 is p + 893. Alternative (D) is the correct one.  

            2.              The GMAT approach

            As a rule of thumb, we should know that no question on GMAT is either too easy or too hard. They are suited for the test constraints: calculators are not allowed and the average time available per questions is no more than 2 minutes! There must be another way!

            Indeed, the luxury of calculators makes us forget that some basic algebraic operations could be perfectly used with numbers just as well.

            When it comes to Algebra, almost everyone recalls the multiplication property a(b + c) = ab +ac. The good news is that we could replicate this simple model here! After all:  893 x 79 = 893 x (78 +1) = 893 x 78 + 893 x 1. Having in mind that that question told us that 893 x 78 = p, then we have that:

            893 x 79 = p + 893 and alternative (D) is correct. No big numbers and the question is straight-forwardly addressed.